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Webinar Invite: SRHR-HIV integration for adolescents and young people

1 day 17 hours ago
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Webinar
SRHR and HIV Integration: From a global to local level
25 September 2019
9:00-10:00 a.m. ET (GMT-4)
2:00-3:00 p.m. WAT | 3:00-4:00 p.m. SAST | 4:00-5:00 p.m. EAT (find your time<https://www.worldtimebuddy.com/?pl=1&lid=5,3369157&h=5>)
Overview
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Paediatric-Adolescent Treatment Africa (PATA)<http://www.teampata.org/>, an action network of health providers and health facilities in sub-Saharan Africa, is organizing a webinar co-hosted by UNICEF on the integration of HIV and sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) services for adolescents and young people.
Hear from a young person, a health care provider, a programme planner and a global expert on integration from global to local levels. The speakers will discuss SRHR-HIV integration from policy, programme and service delivery perspectives, including lessons from clinic-community collaboration and from the beneficiary experience. Tools from the Inter-Agency Working Group on Sexual and Reproductive Health and HIV Linkages will also be presented.
Speakers

Audrey Nosenga, Peer Mentor, Zimbabwe Young Positives (ZY+), Zimbabwe
Futhie Dlamani, READY+ Health Provider, Piggs Peak Hospital, eSwatini
Georgina Caswell, Programme Lead, Frontline AIDS, South Africa
Manjulaa Narasimhan, Department of Reproductive Health and Research, World Health Organization (WHO), Switzerland
Call Details

Join us on Zoom: https://unicef.zoom.us/j/952366179

Webinar ID: 952 366 179
To call in by phone:
Find a number based on your current location: https://zoom.us/u/awBgsksYW

To call in with a room system:
H.323:
162.255.37.11 (US West)
162.255.36.11 (US East)
221.122.88.195 (China)
115.114.131.7 (India)
213.19.144.110 (EMEA)
103.122.166.55 (Australia)
209.9.211.110 (Hong Kong)
64.211.144.160 (Brazil)
69.174.57.160 (Canada)
207.226.132.110 (Japan)
SIP: 952366179@zoomcrc.com<mailto:952366179@zoomcrc.com>
[www.childrenandaids.org]<www.childrenandaids.org>[https://gallery.mailchimp.com/82682f0b9776eacd79feac406/images/4cf6ad4a-aefb-4716-b5c1-d865214c6f3e.png]



Rikke Le Kirkegaard
Programme Specialist | HIV/AIDS
3 United Nations Plaza, New York, USA, 10017
Phone: +1 (929) 401-1682
Email: rlekirkegaard@unicef.org<mailto:rlekirkegaard@unicef.org>
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Webinar Invite SRHR-HIV integration for adolescents and young people.ics

Special Edition Newsletter: 2019 International AIDS Society Conference

3 days 20 hours ago
Dear Children and AIDS Community,

We are pleased to share a special edition of our quarterly newsletter focused on the 2019 IAS Conference. In the past, these newsletters have been shared with UNICEF staff around the world, highlighting UNICEF's work in HIV as well as updates and knowledge products from the global HIV community of relevance to our work with children, adolescents and women. We are now expanding the audience to include the Children and AIDS Community of Practice and hope it is of interest to you. We welcome your thoughts on topics and content - please continue to fill out the survey<https://forms.gle/WNMZiZ2hSo3TrtMq9>.

On behalf of UNICEF's HIV team,

Rikke Le Kirkegaard
rlekirkegaard@unicef.org<mailto:rlekirkegaard@unicef.org>






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UNICEF Children and AIDS Newsletter
Special Edition
Highlights from the 2019 International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Science
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More than 5,000 people gathered in Mexico City on 21-24 July 2019 for the 10th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Science (IAS 2019). Papers and presentations in four tracks - basic science, clinical science, prevention science and implementation science - highlighted new developments and the progress made thus far, the challenges of ending AIDS and the road ahead for HIV programmes, policy and practice. The presentations on novel approaches in prevention, the development of new treatment options and promising results from implementation research are reasons for hope.

But progress for children is critically lagging. While the 160,000 children (aged 0-14 years) who became newly infected in 2018 is a decrease from the 240,000 children newly infected in 2010, the pace of progress has slowed. In 2018, only 54 per cent of children living with HIV received antiretroviral therapy (ART), compared with 82 per cent of pregnant women living with HIV; and treatment data for adolescents aged 15-19 years are unreported in many countries. The global targets for children and adolescents were missed in 2018, and some regions remain further behind than others. These and other key points from the new Start Free, Stay Free, AIDS Free 2019 Report<https://www.unaids.org/en/resources/documents/2019/20190722_UNAIDS_SFSFAF_2019>, which was launched at IAS 2019, paint a picture of the challenges that lie ahead in the future of the HIV response for children.

The evidence presented at IAS 2019 overwhelmingly signals that no one solution will suffice to achieve epidemic control and the end of AIDS; and where children and adolescents are concerned, efforts to reach global targets need to be redoubled. The HIV response must take on challenges at the individual, community and population levels. The innovations we invest in should thus be multi-pronged and person-centred, addressing structural, behavioural and biomedical components of HIV prevention, treatment and retention in care, and adaptable to the unique dynamics of the epidemic in each context.

Programmes and policies need not only innovation in concept and design, but also constant adjustments that reflect the contexts of beneficiaries and appropriate scale-up in partnership with communities. For UNICEF's work towards ending HIV and AIDS for children, the conference highlighted both clinical advances, such as for paediatric treatment and biomedical prevention, and lessons from implementation, including issues of access, equity and programme quality based in the experience of what works in country and on the ground.


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Pictured: Global partners at the launch of the Start Free, Stay Free, AIDS Free 2019 Report at IAS 2019. This new progress report reviews progress and challenges as countries approach the 2020 targets for children and adolescents. Download the report here<https://www.unaids.org/en/resources/documents/2019/20190722_UNAIDS_SFSFAF_2019>.

From the Conference

Key Takeaways

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UNICEF's Chewe Luo (Associate Director of Programmes, Chief of HIV/AIDS), Damilola Walker (Senior Advisor on Adolescents and HIV) and Catherine Langevin-Falcon (Senior Advisor on Knowledge, Advocacy and Partnerships) share their main takeaways from IAS 2019.

The progress on achieving HIV epidemic control offers reason for hope.

1. New developments such as long-acting injectables, implants and vaginal rings hold promise for preventing HIV in adolescent girls and young women, who often face challenges with adherence to pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). more>>
2. We are learning more about dolutegravir use in pregnancy. New evidence on the safety of the drug was presented, and WHO updated its guidelines to recommend dolutegravir as the preferred HIV treatment option in all populations. more>>
3. Strategic HIV testing approaches, including index-linked case finding, partner notification and the use of self-testing approaches, are being used in diverse settings with important implications for children and adolescents who are missed by traditional approaches. more>>
4. Rapid limiting antigen avidity assays (rapid recency assays) not only are helpful for expanding testing strategies but also can be a game changer for public health surveillance and clinical management, as a tool to help track new infections when they are most highly transmissible and where they occur. more>>
5. Structural prevention and layering of HIV prevention interventions, including keeping girls in school, addressing gender-based violence and offering cash transfers, are critical for adolescent girls and young women, for whom the HIV epidemic is driven by a range of socioeconomic factors. more>>
6. Vaccine development remains complex due to the nature of the HIV virus. But the possibility of a safe and effective vaccine is inspiring to all those working to end AIDS - and when one finally becomes available it will be a turning point for epidemic control. more>>
But there is also more work to be done, if epidemic control is to become a reality.

1. The ambitious 90-90-90 targets by 2020 are a rallying cry for progress, but these treatment targets alone are not enough for epidemic control. more>>
2. While progress has been made in the HIV epidemic at large, less progress has been made among adolescent girls and young women in sub-Saharan Africa. Further study based on implementation experiences is needed to determine the best interventions to reduce the high risks of HIV incidence in this population. more>>
3. Where health systems are weak, epidemic control is more challenging to achieve. Ending HIV outbreaks and sustaining progress require alignment with broader strategies to strengthen health systems. more>>
4. In settings where the HIV epidemic is concentrated in key populations, adolescent and young people within these populations have disproportionately high rates of HIV incidence. more>>
5. As we look ahead to 2030, the ethical and social implications of new policies and programmes cannot be an afterthought. With each new frontier of prevention and treatment, new ethical questions will arise; addressing them requires ongoing investment in implementation research looking across disciplines. more>>
Abstracts, slides and rapporteur summaries are available on ias2019.org<http://www.ias2019.org>. For additional discussion, join the conversation on Yammer<https://www.yammer.com/unicef.org/#/threads/inGroup?type=in_group&feedId=537698&view=all>.

A Young Voice at the Conference

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Mercy Mutonyi is a champion for HIV prevention programming for female sex workers and vulnerable young women at the Bar Hostess Empowerment and Support Programme, a women-led organization in Kenya. At IAS 2019, she took over @UNICEF_aids<https://twitter.com/unicef_aids> (Twitter) during the launch of the Start Free Stay Free AIDS Free 2019 Report and spoke at a panel on gender transformative approaches<http://programme.ias2019.org/Programme/Session/30> for the HIV response. Mercy shared with UNICEF her biggest takeaways from this year's conference:


1. What do you see as the most important lessons for programmes and policies?

There were two key points that I hope policymakers and others take from IAS:


1. Community engagement cannot be an afterthought. Often, communities are left out when it comes to HIV prevention research and designing prevention tools. IAS 2019 strongly reinforced the role of the community in HIV science. Voices of young people, women living with HIV, female sex workers and other vulnerable populations count when it comes to designing HIV prevention and treatment approaches.



1. Integrated approaches are what works and what communities need. Following the release of the ECHO study results, the discussion clearly highlighted the need for integrated approaches in the HIV response, and specifically, not to leave out the sexual and reproductive health needs of those vulnerable to HIV. As emphasized in the Start Free, Stay Free, AIDS Free 2019 Report, HIV prevention is beyond just biomedical interventions. Young people and vulnerable populations need a mix of structural, behavioural and biomedical interventions - not just one component. Young people need to feel safe to access and utilize available interventions.


1. Does the research meet the needs of young people at risk of living with HIV? What is missing?



Over the decades, researchers and scientists have made many efforts to design HIV prevention solutions for vulnerable populations. But for any intervention to be acceptable among our communities, it needs to speak to our needs - and this can only be done through meaningful involvement of intended audiences in designing these interventions, beyond just being research participants. We know what will work for us and what won't work for us. This lesson was often discussed at the conference and must continue to be raised.



Also, we need to look at interventions as options because not everyone has the same needs. What one person in one specific situation prefers is perhaps not what another prefers or needs, and prescriptive programmes that lack flexibility and fail to present an array of options makes us less likely to be able to adhere [to treatment]. We also need to be presented with adequate information from the beginning for interventions in the pipeline and those that are being implemented. A lot of times, we receive conflicting messages or scares, as was the case early in the dialogue on dolutegravir in pregnancy. Clarity in language and communication is still missing.



Lastly, policies are a barrier to accessing HIV prevention interventions. This includes policies around age of consent for services for young people as well as around stigma and discrimination against key populations. The newest developments in HIV research will mean nothing on the ground if policies are still a barrier to access them.


1. What makes you most hopeful about the current HIV response and conversations about the future for research, policy and programming?

As a young person, there is much to be hopeful about in current and future HIV research and programming. I see vulnerable populations in the centre of shaping HIV prevention and treatment because their opinions, voices and ideas matter - today and tomorrow. I see a future where HIV prevention and treatment are not perceived as cumbersome, expensive and with limited options.

I am also hopeful for friendly policies that do not prevent vulnerable populations including young women and female sex workers from accessing HIV prevention services or young people living with HIV from accessing treatment and care.

Press Centre

Prevention
New HIV prevention tools address realities of people's lives<http://www.ias2019.org/Media-Centre/Press-releases/ArticleID/244/New-HIV-prevention-tools-address-realities-of-people%E2%80%99s-lives>
IAS (Press Release)
23 July 2019

Treatment
New drugs and more effective treatment regimens featured at IAS 2019<http://www.ias2019.org/Media-Centre/Press-releases/ArticleID/245/New-drugs-and-more-effective-treatment-regimens-featured-at-IAS-2019>
IAS (Press Release)
24 July 2019
Vulnerable Populations
ECHO study finds high rates of HIV and STIs among women in trial countries<http://www.ias2019.org/Media-Centre/Press-releases/ArticleID/241/ECHO-study-finds-high-rates-of-HIV-and-STIs-among-women-in-trial-countries>
IAS (Press Release)
22 July 2019
Prevention
Modest Increase in HIV Prevention Research & Development Funding Encouraging<https://www.avac.org/press-release/modest-increase-hiv-prevention-research-funding>
AVAC (Press Release)
23 July 2019

Treatment
Arm Implant to Prevent HIV in Reach<https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/915997>
Medscape (Conference Coverage)
24 July 2019

Vulnerable Populations
Meet Young People on Their Own Terms and Don't Judge Their Sex Lives, Experts Agree<https://www.thebodypro.com/article/meet-young-people-on-their-own-terms-and-dont-judge-their-sex-lives-experts>
TheBodyPro (Conference Coverage)
26 August 2019

Prevention
Three forms of PrEP stigma in Kenya<http://www.aidsmap.com/news/jul-2019/three-forms-prep-stigma-kenya>
Aidsmap (Conference Coverage)
24 July 2019
Treatment
Islatravir plus doravirine may offer new dual therapy option<http://www.aidsmap.com/news/jul-2019/islatravir-plus-doravirine-may-offer-new-dual-therapy-option>
Aidsmap (Conference Coverage)
25 July 2019
Vulnerable Populations
HIV outcomes for transgender women improved by addressing social and structural issues<http://www.aidsmap.com/news/jul-2019/hiv-outcomes-transgender-women-improved-addressing-social-and-structural-issues>
Aidsmap (Conference Coverage)
29 July 2019

Prevention
PrEP implant could last well over a year<http://www.aidsmap.com/news/jul-2019/prep-implant-could-last-well-over-year>
Aidsmap (Conference Coverage)
24 July 2019

Treatment
Without frequent viral load monitoring dolutegravir-based regimens not the best choice for African youth on failing ART<http://www.aidsmap.com/news/jul-2019/without-frequent-viral-load-monitoring-dolutegravir-based-regimens-not-best-choice>
Aidsmap (Conference Coverage)
30 July 2019

Vulnerable Populations
Cash payments to stay in school reduce HIV incidence in girls and young women, eSwatini study finds<http://www.aidsmap.com/news/aug-2019/cash-payments-stay-school-reduce-hiv-incidence-girls-and-young-women-eswatini-study>
Aidsmap (Conference Coverage)
12 August 2019

Prevention
Could integrating HIV prevention into contraceptive services reduce infections among African women?<http://www.aidsmap.com/news/jul-2019/could-integrating-hiv-prevention-contraceptive-services-reduce-infections-among>
Aidsmap (Conference Coverage)
26 July 2019

Epidemic Status
Is the global HIV response in crisis?<http://www.ias2019.org/Media-Centre/Press-releases/ArticleID/238/Is-the-global-HIV-response-in-crisis>
IAS (Press Release)
21 July 2019
Participatory research
The New Face of HIV and Treating the 'Hardly Reached'<https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/915707>
Medscape (Conference Coverage)
17 July 2019

Prevention
Dapivirine vaginal ring effective and acceptable with longer use<http://www.aidsmap.com/news/jul-2019/dapivirine-vaginal-ring-effective-and-acceptable-longer-use>
Aidsmap (Conference Coverage)
27 July 2019

Epidemic Status
The Future of the HIV Response<https://www.amfar.org/the-future-of-the-hiv-response/>
amfAR, AVAC, Global Fight, IAS (Press Release)
22 July 2019
Participatory research
Communities Should Be Involved in Research. Here Are Some Key Insights on Good Participatory Practice.<https://www.thebodypro.com/article/communities-should-be-involved-in-research>
TheBodyPro (Conference Coverage)
28 August 2019

Treatment
New studies and WHO guidance clarify the way forward for use of dolutegravir in women of childbearing age<http://www.ias2019.org/Media-Centre/Press-releases/ArticleID/240/New-studies-and-WHO-guidance-clarify-the-way-forward-for-use-of-dolutegravir-in-women-of-childbearing-age>
IAS (Press Release)
22 July 2019

Epidemic Status
UNAIDS calls on countries to accelerate efforts and close service gaps to end the AIDS epidemic among children and adolescents<https://www.unaids.org/en/resources/presscentre/pressreleaseandstatementarchive/2019/july/2019722_PR_SFSFAF_report>
UNAIDS (Press Release)
22 July 2019

Cure Research
Beyond antibodies: conference hears of new molecular tools to kill HIV-infected reservoir cells<http://www.aidsmap.com/news/jul-2019/beyond-antibodies-conference-hears-new-molecular-tools-kill-hiv-infected-reservoir>
Aidsmap (Conference Coverage)
22 July 2019

Treatment
Dolutegravir recommended for all in new World Health Organization guidelines<http://www.aidsmap.com/news/jul-2019/dolutegravir-recommended-all-new-world-health-organization-guidelines>
Aidsmap (Conference Coverage)
23 July 2019

Epidemic Status
UNAIDS outlines progress on HIV, but decries funding cuts<http://www.aidsmap.com/news/jul-2019/unaids-outlines-progress-hiv-decries-funding-cuts>
Aidsmap (Conference Coverage)
22 July 2019

Cure Research
Could a better understanding of inflammation help research towards an HIV cure?<http://www.aidsmap.com/news/jul-2019/could-better-understanding-inflammation-help-research-towards-hiv-cure>
Aidsmap (Conference Coverage)
31 July 2019

Treatment
Dolutegravir safety in pregnancy: risk is lower than first reported<http://www.aidsmap.com/news/jul-2019/dolutegravir-safety-pregnancy-risk-lower-first-reported>
Aidsmap (Conference Coverage)
23 July 2019

Epidemic Status
Men accounted for two-thirds of HIV transmission in PopART prevention trial<http://www.aidsmap.com/news/jul-2019/men-accounted-two-thirds-hiv-transmission-popart-prevention-trial>
Aidsmap (Conference Coverage)
24 July 2019
Vaccine Research
Promising HIV vaccine to be tested with gay men and trans people<http://www.aidsmap.com/news/jul-2019/promising-hiv-vaccine-be-tested-gay-men-and-trans-people>
Aidsmap (Conference Coverage)
22 July 2019
Treatment
People with HIV express high satisfaction with monthly injectable regimen<http://www.aidsmap.com/news/jul-2019/people-hiv-express-high-satisfaction-monthly-injectable-regimen>
Aidsmap (Conference Coverage)
23 July 2019

Epidemic Status
Select Countries and Cities Report 90-90-90 Progress in Mexico City<https://www.iapac.org/2019/08/14/90-90-90-targets-hiv-mexico-city/>
IAPAC (Conference Coverage)
14 August 2019
Vaccine Research
Trial vaccine could protect against HIV for more than five years<http://www.aidsmap.com/news/jul-2019/trial-vaccine-could-protect-against-hiv-more-five-years>
Aidsmap (Conference Coverage)
25 July 2019

UNICEF Resources

Webinar on Research Presented at IAS 2019 and the International Workshop on HIV Pediatrics

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Dr. Lynne Mofenson, senior HIV technical advisor at the Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation, joined a UNICEF webinar in which she summarized the HIV/AIDS research related to women, children and adolescents presented at IAS 2019 and the International Workshop on HIV Pediatrics that preceded the conference. The topics presented by Dr. Mofenson include: updates from global UNAIDS and WHO estimates, dolutegravir use and pregnancy outcomes, HIV treatment and prevention in the context of contraception use and pregnancy, antiretroviral drugs for children, HIV prevention and treatment among adolescents and new PrEP options. Watch and share the presentation: childrenandaids.org/ias2019-webinar<http://www.childrenandaids.org/ias2019-webinar>.

Updates to Global HIV Dashboards

[https://data.unicef.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/UN073038-1049x700.jpg]<https://data.unicef.org/resources/children-hiv-aids-global-snapshot/>

The HIV Estimates for Children dashboard<https://data.unicef.org/resources/hiv-estimates-for-children-dashboard/> has been updated with UNICEF calculations based on UNAIDS 2019 estimates. The dashboard presents global, regional and national trends in the HIV response for children, allows for comparisons between geographical regions by indicator and provides statistical profiles by country, age and sex and over time.

Explore the interactive dashboard<https://data.unicef.org/resources/hiv-estimates-for-children-dashboard/> and the updated global snapshot<https://data.unicef.org/resources/children-hiv-aids-global-snapshot/>.

Summary of Evidence on Key Takeaways

1. New developments such as long-acting injectables, implants and vaginal rings hold promise for preventing HIV in adolescent girls and young women, who often face challenges with adherence to pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP).

* Results from a study evaluating daily oral PrEP as a primary prevention strategy in the HIV Prevention Trials Network highlighted the challenges of adherence in adolescent girls and young women participants aged 16-25 years. Adherence declined from 84 per cent at 3 months to 57 per cent at 6 months and 31 per cent at 12 months after PrEP initiation. (Celum, C., et al.<http://programme.ias2019.org/Abstract/Abstract/2328>)
* A new PrEP implant with islatravir, a type of reverse transcriptase inhibitor, held promise for at least one year of prevention. The implants were generally well-tolerated and drug levels remained above targets at both doses through the study period. (Matthews, R. P., et al.<http://programme.ias2019.org/Abstract/Abstract/4843>)
* The final results from the previously reported HOPE study<http://www.aidsmap.com/news/mar-2018/vaginal-ring-more-hope-dream-higher-adherence-and-better-effectiveness-seen-open> demonstrated effectiveness and tolerability of a vaginal ring containing dapivirine among women in Africa over a year-long period. The ring reduced the risk for HIV infection by an estimated 39 per cent, although this result is limited by the lack of a contemporaneous placebo group. However, it is notable that when offered a choice, the vast majority of women accepted the dapivirine vaginal ring (92 per cent) and continued in the study throughout 12 months. (Baeten J., et al.<http://programme.ias2019.org/Abstract/Abstract/3219>)
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2. We are learning more about dolutegravir use in pregnancy. New evidence on the safety of the drug was presented, and WHO updated its guidelines to recommend dolutegravir as the preferred HIV treatment option in all populations.

* New analyses from Botswana and Brazil suggest that the risk of neural tube defects among infants of women taking dolutegravir is lower than previously reported by the Tsepamo study (Botswana) last year. The new analysis from Botswana included 22 health facilities that were not included in the Tsepamo study and found one case of neural tube defects in infants among 152 mothers with dolutegravir use, compared to two cases among 2,328 HIV-negative mothers. (Raesima, M. M., et al.<http://programme.ias2019.org/Abstract/Abstract/5089>) Thus, there remains a smaller increase in prevalence of neural tube defects observed among children of pregnant women living with HIV on dolutegravir compared to those of pregnant women without HIV in this study. A surveillance-based study from Brazil showed no incidence of neutral tube defects in a cohort of 382 women using dolutegravir during pregnancy. Around half of this cohort received folic acid supplementation. (Pereira, G., et al.<http://programme.ias2019.org/Abstract/Abstract/4991>)
* WHO updated its guidelines<https://www.who.int/hiv/pub/arv/arv-update-2019-policy/en/> to recommend dolutegravir as the preferred first-line and second-line treatment for all populations including pregnant women, based on a review of new evidence. Still, it is important to weigh risks against benefits for each sub-population and understand the limitations of evidence with small cohort sizes and narrow geographical focus. System strengthening measures will be required to reduce the risk of neural tube defects in infants among pregnant women living with HIV, including scaled-up surveillance and folate supplementation during pregnancy. (See slides<http://programme.ias2019.org/Programme/Session/154>)
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3. Strategic HIV testing approaches, including index-linked case finding, partner notification and the use of self-testing approaches, are being used in diverse settings with important implications for children and adolescents who are missed by traditional approaches.

* Results from the PEPFAR-supported Community Impact to Reach Key and Underserved Individuals for Treatment and Support (CIRKUITS) project, on index and social network testing for adolescents and young people in Zambia, were presented. Trained community health workers identified 1,809 individuals who were HIV-positive and followed up with 87 per cent of them for contacts and social networks. The HIV yield, or proportion of tests performed that are positive, in the population was 32 per cent. (Mwango, L. K., et al.<http://programme.ias2019.org/Abstract/Abstract/4088>)
* Results of self-testing interventions were presented from several countries. In Malawi and Burundi, peer distributors improved uptake of HIV self-testing kits by female sex workers. Community engagement was a key component of an HIV self-testing intervention in Viet Nam. In addition to community-based distribution of kits, the programme included outreach through social media. (See slides<http://programme.ias2019.org/Programme/Session/84>)
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4. Rapid limiting antigen avidity assays (rapid recency assays) not only are helpful for expanding testing strategies but also can be a game changer for public health surveillance and clinical management, as a tool to help track new infections when they are most highly transmissible and where they occur.

* Rapid recency assays for HIV can distinguish recent infections occurring within the last 12 months from long-term infections. Ambassador Deborah Birx of PEPFAR emphasized the importance of expanding recency testing as a component of routine programme service delivery in all PEPFAR countries. (See video<https://trace-recency.org/ias-2019/>)
* Early evidence of recency testing using limiting antigen avidity assays was shared from Ethiopia, Malawi, Rwanda and Viet Nam under the Tracking with Recency Assays to Control the Epidemic (TRACE) project. A validation study embedded in scale-up efforts showed concurrence between ELISA tests (considered the 'gold standard' for clinical diagnosis) and the limiting antigen avidity assays. (See summary of presentations<https://trace-recency.org/recency-testing-at-ias-2019/>)
* Recency testing can be an important surveillance tool to understand new infections in young people; pilot projects from across the field found alarming rates of HIV incidence among adolescent girls and young women. A recency pilot among pregnant adolescent girls and young women in Malawi identified 10 per cent of participants to be recently infected with the bulk of new infections in a younger cohort aged 13-19 years. (See slides<https://trace-recency.org/ias-2019/>)
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5. Structural prevention and layering of HIV prevention interventions, including keeping girls in school, addressing gender-based violence and offering cash transfers, are critical for adolescent girls and young women, for whom the HIV epidemic is driven by a range of socioeconomic factors.

* The Population Council presented a novel analysis to determine the relative contributions of layered interventions for adolescent girls aged 15-19 years from Zambia. The adolescent girls, all enrolled in the DREAMS programme, were more likely to have comprehensive knowledge about HIV and report consistent condom use when they received educational and economic interventions in addition to social asset-building and safe spaces interventions. (Mathur, S., et al.<http://programme.ias2019.org/Abstract/Abstract/1243>)
* In Eswatini, the Sitakhela Liskusasa Impact Evaluation found the lowest incidence of HIV in a cohort of adolescent girls and young women aged 15-22 years who received a combination of financial and educational interventions compared to those who received only financial incentives or only education interventions. (Gorgens, M., et al.<http://programme.ias2019.org/Abstract/Abstract/4943>)
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6. Vaccine development remains complex due to the nature of the HIV virus. But the possibility of a safe and effective vaccine is inspiring to all those working to end AIDS - and when one finally becomes available it will be a turning point for epidemic control.

* The landmark study in HIV vaccine development to date has been the RV144 efficacy trial in Thailand, which showed that adults who received the experimental vaccine were 31 per cent less likely to acquire HIV at the end of the 3.5-year study period. The latest results from the Phase 2a ASCENT trial, a randomized controlled trial designed to assess safety, tolerability and antibody response of two vaccine regimens, showed promising results for prime-boost combination among low-risk HIV-negative adults in Kenya, Rwanda and the United States. (Stieh, D. J., et al<http://programme.ias2019.org/Abstract/Abstract/4979>.)
* A new Phase 3 trial called Mosaico, which aims to demonstrate 70 per cent vaccine efficacy, will soon begin in study sites across North America, South America and Europe. (See press conference video<http://programme.ias2019.org/Programme/Session/181>)
Back to top>>

7. The ambitious 90-90-90 targets by 2020 are a rallying cry for progress but these treatment targets alone are not enough for epidemic control.

* The HPTN 071 (PopART) trial randomized communities in Zambia and South Africa to a standard of care, an intervention of universal HIV testing and voluntary medical male circumcision with universal ART, or an intervention of ART by national guidelines with a primary outcome of HIV incidence. While the universal ART intervention achieved 90-90-90 targets in the study population, it was not associated with a significant reduction in HIV incidence. PopART was presented at CROI 2019 earlier this year. At IAS 2019, a discussion addressed efficacy and cost-effectiveness of the intervention, additional modelling and community engagement during the trial. (See video<http://programme.ias2019.org/Programme/Session/41>) While the intervention might have had better outcomes over a longer period of time, the population it reached is important to consider. The disconnect between individuals accessing treatment to achieve viral suppression and population-level changes in the epidemic could be because interventions do not adequately address which populations have access to treatment and are supported to be retained in care. (See the discussion in The Lancet HIV<https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lanhiv/article/PIIS2352-3018(19)30226-7/fulltext>)
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8. While progress has been made in the HIV epidemic at large, less progress has been made among adolescent girls and young women in sub-Saharan Africa. Further study based on implementation experiences is needed to determine the best interventions to reduce the high risks of HIV incidence in this population.

* Additional analyses from the Evidence for Contraceptive Options and HIV Outcomes (ECHO), a randomized clinical trial comparing HIV risk among women on three common hormonal contraception methods, showed an alarming rate of HIV incidence in the study population of girls and women aged 16-35 years. The trial, conducted in Eswatini, Kenya, South Africa and Zambia, found no difference in HIV risk by contraceptive method (press release<http://www.ias2019.org/Media-Centre/Press-releases/ArticleID/241/ECHO-study-finds-high-rates-of-HIV-and-STIs-among-women-in-trial-countries>). During the study period, 397 new HIV infections occurred across all study arms, which was an incidence rate of 3.81 per 100 woman-years. (See slides<http://programme.ias2019.org/Programme/Session/126>)
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9. Where health systems are weak, epidemic control is more challenging to achieve. Ending HIV outbreaks and sustaining progress require alignment with broader strategies to strengthen health systems.

* Weak health systems can exacerbate the crisis of the HIV epidemic. In 2019, Pakistan saw an HIV outbreak in the Larkana district, Sindh province; among 876 new cases found between April and June, 82 per cent (719) were children under the age of 15 years. A WHO-led response suggested that most infections occurred through unsafe injection practices and poor infection control practices in clinics and hospitals. The importance of investing in robust health systems that meet established quality of care standards and can respond quickly to outbreaks cannot be ignored. Further studies are needed to better understand the source and nature of new outbreaks. (See slides<http://programme.ias2019.org/Programme/Session/171>)
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10. In settings where the HIV epidemic is concentrated in key populations, adolescent and young people within these populations have disproportionately high rates of HIV incidence.

* In Viet Nam, the HIV epidemic is concentrated in key populations, particularly men who have sex with men. An analysis of HIV incidence in this population using a novel recency test found that nearly all (92.8 per cent) of recent infections in the cohort were among young men 24 years of age and below. (Vu, D., et al.<http://programme.ias2019.org/Abstract/Abstract/2576>) Routine recency testing in Viet Nam has found HIV transmission to be greatest among young people with the median age of new infections at 23 years. (See slides<http://programme.ias2019.org/Programme/Session/55>)
* Similarly in Thailand, data from the Linkages across the Continuum of HIV Services for Key Populations Affected by HIV (LINKAGES) project showed that young men who have sex with men under the age of 20 have high HIV prevalence and incidence compared to older men, and these younger men have some of the lowest rates of testing uptake. Only 11.2 per cent of men under 20 were tested compared to 59 per cent of men aged 25-49 years, according to LINKAGES data between 2016 and 2018. (Slides upcoming<http://www.infectiousdiseasesonline.com/hiv-pediatrics-2019-presentations/>)
Back to top>>

11. As we look ahead to 2030, the ethical and social implications of new policies and programmes cannot be an afterthought. With each new frontier of prevention and treatment, new ethical questions will arise; addressing them requires ongoing investment in implementation research looking across disciplines.

* While there is considerable evidence on safe breastfeeding for mothers living with HIV and on treatment, global recommendations on breastfeeding must be implemented according to national and subnational contexts Local variations in the socio-economic and cultural context, the health of the mother-baby pair and the risks of HIV transmission weighed against the benefits of breastfeeding should influence a mother's decision to breastfeed her baby, or not. (Session<http://programme.ias2019.org/Programme/Session/28>)

* Large-scale investments are being made in areas of data collection and analysis as part of HIV research and programme planning. Countries and institutions investing in large-scale, population-based surveys must address the obligation to return results from HIV tests and data analysis to individuals and communities and to inform them of implications for health beyond HIV. Such surveys that are siloed in HIV and fail to include other conditions and issue areas are missed opportunities to address public health from an integrated lens. (Session<http://programme.ias2019.org/Programme/Session/128>)
* In clinical trials and prevention research, there is a need to communicate and engage with communities to truly reach the goals of informed consent. This includes engaging individuals living with HIV in the design and implementation stages of studies, communicating the progress of studies using language that is accessible and culturally sensitive, conveying the possibilities of further analysis of the data collected and conducting relevant follow-up. (Multiple sessions, including a PrEP demonstration project in Brazil<http://programme.ias2019.org/Programme/Session/132> and discussions by the HIV Vaccine Trial Network and HIV Prevention Trials Network<http://programme.ias2019.org/Abstract/Abstract/1369>)
Back to top>>


For more, see rapporteur summaries<http://www.ias2019.org/Programme/The-conference/Rapporteur-summaries> and other resources on ias2019.org<http://www.ias2019.org>

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Children and AIDS Website<http://www.childrenandaids.org/>

Save the Date: SRHR-HIV Integration Webinar

6 days 15 hours ago
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UNICEF Learning Collaborative
is pleased to share
Save the Date
Webinar on SRHR and HIV Integration: From a global to local level
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Wednesday, 25 September 2019

9:00-10:00 am New York (GMT-4)
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Paediatric-Adolescent Treatment Africa (PATA)<http://www.teampata.org/>, an action network of health providers and health facilities in sub-Saharan Africa, is organizing a webinar co-hosted by UNICEF on the integration of HIV and sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) services for adolescents and young people. The webinar will present linkages from global policy to local service delivery levels with perspectives from young people, health care providers, programme planners and global experts.
Speakers include:

* Manjulaa Narasimhan, Department of Reproductive Health and Research, World Health Organization (WHO), Switzerland
* Georgina Caswell, Programme Lead, Frontline AIDS, South Africa
* Sister Futhie Dlamani, READY+ Health Provider, Piggs Peak Hospital, eSwatini
* Audrey Nosenga, Peer Mentor, Zimbabwe Young Positives (ZY+), Zimbabwe
Please save the date. Zoom call details to follow.


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Children and AIDS Website<http://www.childrenandaids.org/>


Rikke Le Kirkegaard
Programme Specialist | HIV/AIDS
3 United Nations Plaza, New York, USA, 10017
Phone: +1 (929) 401-1682
Email: rlekirkegaard@unicef.org<mailto:rlekirkegaard@unicef.org>
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Reminder: Children and AIDS Community of Practice Relaunch

1 week 6 days ago
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UNICEF Learning Collaborative

Reminder: The Children and AIDS Community of Practice is relaunching!

Please Complete the Feedback Form<https://forms.gle/dCTrAh4y6w2oa87K6>

Dear community members,

Thank you very much to all who have completed the feedback form<https://forms.gle/dCTrAh4y6w2oa87K6> thus far. Please continue to add your comments by Tuesday, 10 September 2019.

Since 2013, the Children and AIDS Community of Practice has been connecting professionals around the world on topics around HIV and AIDS, infants, children, adolescents and women. The community will be relaunched on a new platform this year. What would you like to see from the new community? What have you found most useful about the current one? Please share your thoughts using the link above.

If you are no longer interested and would like to stop receiving updates, please email to unsubscribe<mailto:leave.childrenandaids@knowledge-gateway.org>.


Best,

UNICEF HIV team
www.unicef.org/HIV<http://www.unicef.org/HIV>

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Children and AIDS Website<http://www.childrenandaids.org/>


Rikke Le Kirkegaard
Programme Specialist | HIV/AIDS
3 United Nations Plaza, New York, USA, 10017
Phone: +1 (929) 401-1682
Email: rlekirkegaard@unicef.org<mailto:rlekirkegaard@unicef.org>
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Updates on Point-of-Care Technologies for HIV Testing

2 weeks 1 day ago
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UNICEF Learning Collaborative
is pleased to share
Updates on Point-of-Care
Diagnostic Technologies for HIV
The African Society of Laboratory Medicine (ASLM), the Clinton Health Access Initiative (CHAI) and UNICEF with funding from Unitaid work with ministries of health and other partners to increase access to point-of-care (POC) diagnostic technologies for early infant diagnosis of HIV and viral load monitoring. Find recent updates from the partnership below.
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Accelerating Access to POC Viral Load Testing for Pregnant and Breastfeeding Women Living With HIV
[https://gallery.mailchimp.com/82682f0b9776eacd79feac406/images/e8eb1d76-38c6-4187-800b-aaed5e77237d.png]<http://www.childrenandaids.org/node/992>

This brief highlights policies and programmes related to POC viral load testing among pregnant and breastfeeding women living with HIV. In many countries, viral load policies are not differentiated for pregnant and breastfeeding women despite evidence that timely viral load monitoring is critical for this population. Same-day results for pregnant and breastfeeding women can help ensure timely initiation of ART, improved rates of viral suppression and retention in care to support efforts of preventing vertical transmission of HIV.

Download in English <http://www.childrenandaids.org/sites/default/files/2019-09/Accelerating%20Access%20to%20POC%20VL_digital_Eng.pdf> and in French<http://www.childrenandaids.org/sites/default/files/2019-09/Accelerating%20Access%20to%20POC%20VL_French_digital.pdf>.

Integrated Testing for TB and HIV using GeneXpert Devices Expands Access to Near-POC Testing
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This brief summarizes lessons learned from Zimbabwe's pilot implementation of integrated testing. Leveraging existing POC devices such as GeneXpert platforms is a critical approach to optimize resources and increase access to rapid testing services. In Zimbabwe, the Ministry of Health and Child Care along with partners deployed GeneXpert platforms machines for tuberculosis and HIV testing to improve access to early infant HIV diagnosis and viral load testing. These findings describe the benefits of integrated testing for individuals, health providers and the health system and are a resource for other countries looking to scale up POC integrated testing.

Download in English <http://www.childrenandaids.org/sites/default/files/2019-09/Integrated%20Testing%20for%20TB%20and%20HIV%20Zimbabwe_Eng_digital.pdf> and in French<http://www.childrenandaids.org/sites/default/files/2019-09/Integrated%20Testing%20for%20TB%20and%20HIV%20Zimbabwe_French_digital.pdf>.

Special Issue of Lab Culture
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Lab Culture is ASLM's magazine for laboratory professionals and other stakeholders working in laboratory medicine in Africa. This special issue focuses on POC technologies, including a feature on early infant diagnosis for HIV and lessons learned from HIV-tuberculosis integrated testing programmes. Download the issue<http://www.aslm.org/stay-informed/press-room/lab-culture-newsletter/>.


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Children and AIDS Website<http://www.childrenandaids.org/>



Rikke Le Kirkegaard
Programme Specialist | HIV/AIDS
3 United Nations Plaza, New York, USA, 10017
Phone: +1 (929) 401-1682
Email: rlekirkegaard@unicef.org<mailto:rlekirkegaard@unicef.org>
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Relaunching the Children and AIDS Community of Practice

3 weeks 1 day ago
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UNICEF Learning Collaborative

Dear community members,

Since 2013, the Children and AIDS Community of Practice has been connecting professionals around the world on topics around HIV and AIDS, infants, children, adolescents and women. More than 4,000 people now subscribe to this community. Thank you for being one of them.

This year, we will be relaunching this global community on a new platform and want to hear from you about your experiences. Please let us know<https://forms.gle/dCTrAh4y6w2oa87K6> how you would like to engage with the new Children and AIDS Community of Practice. Share your feedback by Tuesday, 10 September 2019.

The Community of Practice will include frequent updates and new opportunities for engagement. If you are no longer interested and would like to stop receiving updates, please email to unsubscribe<mailto:leave.childrenandaids@knowledge-gateway.org>.

For questions, contact Rikke Le Kirkegaard at rlekirkegaard@unicef.org<mailto:rlekirkegaard@unicef.org?subject=UNICEF%20Learning%20Collaborative>.


Best,

UNICEF HIV team
www.unicef.org/HIV<http://www.unicef.org/HIV>

Access the Feedback Form<https://forms.gle/dCTrAh4y6w2oa87K6>

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Children and AIDS Website<http://www.childrenandaids.org/>



Rikke Le Kirkegaard
Programme Specialist | HIV/AIDS
3 United Nations Plaza, New York, USA, 10017
Phone: +1 (929) 401-1682
Email: rlekirkegaard@unicef.org<mailto:rlekirkegaard@unicef.org>
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Webinar Invite: Adolescent HIV service delivery

3 weeks 6 days ago
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UNICEF Learning Collaborative
is pleased to share an invite for a
Webinar from the WHO-HIV Department
Building Bridges - Improving Adolescent HIV Service Delivery
Through South to South Learning
Join the World Health Organization (WHO) for a webinar on differentiated service delivery for adolescent HIV. The webinar will include a discussion of best practices, country perspectives from Ghana and Eswatini, stakeholder perspectives and viewpoints from a young person on adolescent HIV service delivery. Speakers include representatives of Africaid Zvandiri, the Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation, UNICEF and WHO.

Tuesday, 3 September 2019
04:00-05:15 PM CEST (UTC+1)

Join via WebEx<https://who-meeting.webex.com/who-meeting/j.php?MTID=m0ad910cfff4f116167b904a9b9a4aeb7>

Join by phone
Find global call-in numbers<https://who-meeting.webex.com/cmp3300/webcomponents/widget/globalcallin/globalcallin.do?MTID=ma76064628b6539cef40de5dc9b4b2903&MTID=ma76064628b6539cef40de5dc9b4b2903&MTID=ma76064628b6539cef40de5dc9b4b2903&MTID=ma76064628b6539cef40de5dc9b4b2903&serviceType=MC&serviceType=MC&serviceType=MC&eventID=846608897&eventID=846608897&eventID=846608897&siteurl=who-meeting&siteurl=who-meeting&siteurl=who-meeting&apiname=globalcallin.php&apiname=globalcallin.php&apiname=globalcallin.php&rnd=3196864191&rnd=3196864191&rnd=3196864191&tollFree=0&tollFree=0&tollFree=0&needFilter=false&needFilter=false&needFilter=false&actappname=cmp3300&actappname=cmp3300&actname=/webcomponents/widget/globalcallin/gcnredirector.do&actname=/webcomponents/widget/globalcallin/gcnredirector.do&renewticket=0>
Access code: 842 321 557

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Please find more information in the attached invite and share with your networks. For any questions, contact Wole Ameyan at ameyanw@who.int<mailto:ameyanw@who.int>.
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Children and AIDS Website<http://www.childrenandaids.org/>

Attachments
WHO-Adolescent DSD Webinar-20190903.pdf

Registration for AGYW Learning Collaborative

1 month ago
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UNICEF Learning Collaborative
is pleased to share
Registration and Upcoming Launch of the
Adolescent Girls and Young Women Learning Collaborative
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Call for those interested in knowledge exchange and programming for adolescent girls and young women!
If you are working to empower and promote the health and well-being of adolescent girls and young women (AGYW), UNICEF would like to invite you to join a new Learning Collaborative to be launched in late-August.

Please complete this online registration form<https://forms.gle/EprdRWydZ4WEhvqt7> and a short survey on how the Learning Collaborative can serve partners working to improve the quality of programmes for AGYW.
The Adolescent Girls and Young Women Learning Collaborative is a virtual hub for the generation and exchange of programme knowledge, tools and insights to promote HIV prevention and the health and well-being of AGYW. The Learning Collaborative will be open to programme implementers, policy makers, researchers and others who are interested in sharing learning on AGYW programmes, particularly from sub-Saharan Africa. Representatives of United Nations organizations, governments, academia, donor organizations, the private sector and civil society organizations, including youth representatives from AGYW networks, are also invited to join. More details, including a live link on childrenandaids.org<http://www.childrenandaids.org/>, will be shared shortly.

The Adolescent Girls and Young Women Learning Collaborative offers opportunities to:


* contribute contents and publications for learning and knowledge exchange
* co-create and participate in webinars
* join a virtual discussion group and connect with others
* receive the latest updates on AGYW data, innovations, events and grants

Complete<https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScBtFlcXoqoHUCQC7kUmaptGO1AlBLBXvcAE8QNn1A-OwXMpQ/viewform> the survey and registration form.

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For questions and comments about the Adolescent Girls and Young Women Learning Collaborative, please contact Ornwipa Pam Rugkhla: orugkhla@unicef.org<mailto:orugkhla@unicef.org>.


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Children and AIDS Website<http://www.childrenandaids.org/>


Rikke Le Kirkegaard
Programme Specialist | HIV/AIDS
3 United Nations Plaza, New York, USA, 10017
Phone: +1 (929) 401-1682
Email: rlekirkegaard@unicef.org<mailto:rlekirkegaard@unicef.org>
.................................................................................
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IAS 2019 Webinar Presentation and Recording

1 month 1 week ago
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UNICEF Learning Collaborative
is pleased to share
Webinar Recording
Updates from IAS 2019

[https://gallery.mailchimp.com/82682f0b9776eacd79feac406/images/c504bdf4-bb72-4772-a2f1-6bcca3e65622.jpg]<http://www.childrenandaids.org/ias2019-webinar>
On 5 August 2019, UNICEF hosted a webinar on the latest science presented at the 11th International Workshop on HIV Pediatrics and 10th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Science (IAS 2019) in Mexico City. Dr. Lynne Mofenson, senior HIV technical advisor at the Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation, shared a curated summary of research related to HIV, pregnant and breastfeeding women, children and adolescents.

The webinar recording and presentation slides (abbreviated and full versions) are now available on childrenandaids.org. View them here<http://childrenandaids.org/ias2019-webinar>.

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Children and AIDS Website<http://www.childrenandaids.org/>

Rikke Le Kirkegaard
Programme Specialist | HIV/AIDS
3 United Nations Plaza, New York, USA, 10017
Phone: +1 (929) 401-1682
Email: rlekirkegaard@unicef.org<mailto:rlekirkegaard@unicef.org>
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Webinar: Updates from IAS 2019

1 month 3 weeks ago
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UNICEF Learning Collaborative
is pleased to invite you to a


Webinar:
Updates on Children, Adolescents and HIV
from IAS 2019

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Monday, August 5, 2019
9:00-10:30 AM EST

Dr. Lynne Mofenson will present a summary of the latest science related to HIV, women, children and adolescents shared at IAS 2019.

Dr. Mofenson is currently senior HIV technical advisor at the Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation. She was at the National Institutes of Health from 1989 until her retirement in 2014, where she was responsible for programme planning and the development and scientific direction of research studies and clinical trials in domestic and international paediatric, adolescent and maternal HIV infection.



NOTE: Please download and test the software prior to the webinar for optimal connectivity. It is also advisable to use headphones for good audio quality and to consult your IT focal point for support.
Join us on Zoom: https://unicef.zoom.us/j/181961125
(On a PC, Mac, iPad, iPhone or Android device)

Dial-in by phone (for higher quality, dial a number based on your current location):
US: +1 646 558 8656 or +1 669 900 6833
888 788 0099 (Toll Free) or 877 853 5247 (Toll Free)
International numbers available: https://zoom.us/u/abt4D3cxmM
Webinar ID: 181 961 125

Or an H.323/SIP room system:
H.323:
162.255.37.11 (US West)
162.255.36.11 (US East)
221.122.88.195 (China)
115.114.131.7 (India)
213.19.144.110 (EMEA)
103.122.166.55 (Australia)
209.9.211.110 (Hong Kong)
64.211.144.160 (Brazil)
69.174.57.160 (Canada)
207.226.132.110 (Japan)
Webinar ID: 181 961 125

SIP: 181961125@zoomcrc.com<mailto:181961125@zoomcrc.com>
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Children and AIDS Website<http://www.childrenandaids.org/>


Rikke Le Kirkegaard
Programme Specialist | HIV/AIDS
3 United Nations Plaza, New York, USA, 10017
Phone: +1 (929) 401-1682
Email: rlekirkegaard@unicef.org<mailto:rlekirkegaard@unicef.org>
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Three Frees Updates for IAS 2019, Mexico City

2 months ago
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UNICEF Learning Collaborative
is pleased to share

Updates for the 10th IAS Conference on HIV Science
21-24 July 2019
Join the Three Frees partners in Mexico!
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Launch of the Start Free Stay Free AIDS Free Report
Join the partnership for the launch of the Start Free Stay Free AIDS Free 2019 Report during a dedicated satellite session on Monday 22 July 2019 (07h00-08h30) at Palacio de Valparaíso 1, Centro Citibanamex Convention Center.

In addition to findings of the report, the session will discuss best practices from each of the Start Free Stay Free AIDS Free working groups, community and country perspectives, and key actions needed to accelerate progress towards the 2020 targets. Ambassador Deborah Birx, United States Global AIDS Coordinator, and Dr. Shannon Hader, UNAIDS Deputy Executive Director of Programme, will co-chair the launch.
Roadmap for Three Frees Partner Events
[cid:image003.png@01D53E1A.98F6CA80]<http://www.childrenandaids.org/ias2019-roadmap>
Explore the Three Frees Roadmap<http://www.childrenandaids.org/ias2019-roadmap> to find events on children and adolescents hosted by partners of the Start Free Stay Free AIDS Free framework.

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Children and AIDS Website<http://www.childrenandaids.org/>


Rikke Le Kirkegaard
Programme Specialist | HIV/AIDS
3 United Nations Plaza, New York, USA, 10017
Phone: +1 (929) 401-1682
Email: rlekirkegaard@unicef.org<mailto:rlekirkegaard@unicef.org>
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Invitation: International Workshop on HIV Pediatrics, 19–20 July

2 months 1 week ago
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UNICEF Learning Collaborative
is pleased to share an invite for the

International Workshop on HIV Pediatrics

[https://gallery.mailchimp.com/82682f0b9776eacd79feac406/images/bdb0c101-28af-4024-b9f9-2859960afcda.png]<https://www.virology-education.com/event/upcoming/11th-international-workshop-hiv-pediatrics/>
Virology Education invites you to attend the International Workshop on HIV Pediatrics 2019 on 19–20 July ahead of the 10th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Science (IAS 2019).

The International Workshop on HIV Pediatrics focuses on research in prevention and treatment of HIV infections in infants, children and adolescents. The annual workshop has been held alongside the IAS since 2009 and brings together global experts in paediatric, adolescent and maternal HIV research.
Learn more about the workshop and register here<https://www.virology-education.com/event/upcoming/11th-international-workshop-hiv-pediatrics/>.
[https://gallery.mailchimp.com/82682f0b9776eacd79feac406/images/6040e143-be6f-4c89-831c-0147c76cc331.png]<https://virology.eventsair.com/11hivped/hivped>


[https://gallery.mailchimp.com/82682f0b9776eacd79feac406/images/4752c44e-7697-48ef-ba69-6f11f890566c.png]

Children and AIDS Website<http://www.childrenandaids.org/>


Rikke Le Kirkegaard
Programme Specialist | HIV/AIDS
3 United Nations Plaza, New York, USA, 10017
Phone: +1 (929) 401-1682
Email: rlekirkegaard@unicef.org<mailto:rlekirkegaard@unicef.org>
………………………………………………………………………
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Webinar Recording on Disclosure of HIV Status for Children

2 months 4 weeks ago
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UNICEF Learning Collaborative
is pleased to share

Webinar Recording: Disclosure of HIV Status Toolkit for Paediatric and Adolescent Populations

[https://gallery.mailchimp.com/82682f0b9776eacd79feac406/images/4eee4051-b0f2-4720-b488-c343e879fcf6.jpg]<http://childrenandaids.org/disclosure-toolkit-webinar>
On 19 June 2019, the Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation (EGPAF) and UNICEF conducted a webinar on the disclosure of HIV status in paediatric and adolescent care. The webinar presented components of the Disclosure of HIV Status Toolkit for Pediatric and Adolescent Populations, an evidence-based toolkit developed by EGPAF as part of the New Horizons Advancing Pediatric HIV Care Collaborative. It is now available for download in English and French<mailto:http://www.pedaids.org/resource/disclosure-of-hiv-status-toolkit-for-pediatric-and-adolescent-populations/>; a Portuguese version will soon be released.

The toolkit provides general guidance, practical tools and job aides including disclosure algorithms for caregivers, providers, and children and adolescents themselves to deliver informed disclosure. The speakers discussed the meaningful engagement of adolescents in the toolkit development process through the active participation of youth advisors in developing and validating the tools. The webinar discussion also addressed the barriers and enablers of disclosure in HIV care for children and adolescents.

See the webinar recording and download the presentation at: childrenandaids.org/disclosure-toolkit-webinar<http://www.childrenandaids.org/disclosure-toolkit-webinar>

Please contact Rikke Le Kirkegaard (rlekirkegaard@unicef.org<mailto:rlekirkegaard@unicef.org>) for any additional questions for the speakers. For more information on the New Horizons Collaborative, contact newhorizons@pedaids.org<mailto:newhorizons@pedaids.org>.
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Children and AIDS<http://www.childrenandaids.org/>



Rikke Le Kirkegaard
Programme Specialist | HIV/AIDS
3 United Nations Plaza, New York, USA, 10017
Phone: +1 (929) 401-1682
Email: rlekirkegaard@unicef.org<mailto:rlekirkegaard@unicef.org>
.................................................................................
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Webinar: HIV Disclosure for Children and Adolescents

3 months ago
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UNICEF Learning Collaborative
is pleased to invite you to a
Webinar on Disclosure of HIV Status for Children and Adolescents
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Wednesday, June 19, 2019
8:30-9:30 AM EST

The Disclosure of HIV Status Toolkit for Pediatric and Adolescent Populations<http://www.pedaids.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NewHorizonsDisclosureToolkit_FINAL.pdf> was developed by the Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation (EGPAF) as part of the New Horizons Advancing Pediatric HIV Care Collaborative. The toolkit provides general guidance and tools for use in clinical practice to deliver successful and informed disclosure.

Join EGPAF and UNICEF for a webinar on the policy and practice aspects of HIV disclosure for pediatric and adolescent populations, a presentation of the toolkit components and a discussion on its development process with youth participation at its core.

Speakers include:

* Dr. Nande Putta, Programme Specialist (Child Survival), UNICEF
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Dr. Nande Putta is a medical doctor, epidemiologist, data scientist and public health leader with over 15 years of experience managing teams as well as collaborative partnerships to yield results for the health of newborns, children, adolescents and women. She has worked with UNICEF in Kenya and New York HQ since 2011.

* Dr. Natella Rakhmanina, Senior Technical Advisor, EGPAF
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In addition to her role with EGPAF, Dr. Natella Rakhmanina is a Professor of Pediatrics at the George Washington University and serves as a Director of the HIV Programme at Children's National Medical Center in Washington, DC, USA. She has been providing clinical care to HIV-infected infants, children and adolescents for almost 20 years and is a successful clinical researcher within this field.

* Dr. Judith Kose, Regional Technical Advisor (Pediatric HIV), EGPAF
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Dr. Judith Kose-Otieno is a Pediatrician with sub-specialty in Infectious Diseases and with experience in clinical and operational research. She is a public health specialist with over 15 years of experience managing multi-donor health programs and provides targeted technical assistance and leadership in pediatric HIV within country and global programmes for EGPAF based in Kenya.

* Joshua Ochieng, Member, Committee of African Youth Advisors, EGPAF
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Joshua Ochieng is a 21-year-old man living with HIV in Kenya, who struggled with adherence from an early age due to stigma and orphan hood. His experiences inspired him to take on peer leadership roles and become active in local HIV youth networks. Joshua is currently studying community development at Maseno University and serves on EGPAF's Committee of African Youth Advisors.

NOTE: Please download and test the software prior to the webinar for optimal connectivity. It is also advisable to use headphones for good audio quality and to consult your IT focal point for support.

Join Skype Meeting<https://meet.unicef.org/cmannikarottu/CNR0JP83>
Trouble Joining? Try Skype Web App<https://meet.unicef.org/cmannikarottu/B7CVKBZV?sl=1>

Join by phone
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Turkey : +902169002848<tel:Turkey%20:%20+902169002848> (Global) Turkish (Turkey)
Find a local number<https://dialin.unicef.org/>

Conference ID: 506134684

Forgot your dial-in PIN?<https://dialin.unicef.org/> | Help<https://o15.officeredir.microsoft.com/r/rlidLync15?clid=1033&p1=5&p2=2009>



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Children and AIDS Site<http://www.childrenandaids.org/>

Attachments
Webinar HIV Disclosure for Children and Adolescents.ics

Save the Date: HIV Disclosure for Children and Adolescents

3 months 1 week ago
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UNICEF Learning Collaborative

Save the Date
Webinar on Disclosure of HIV Status
for Children and Adolescents
[https://gallery.mailchimp.com/82682f0b9776eacd79feac406/images/14304cc1-5eb6-4630-8d38-8979b8e075ff.png]
Wednesday, June 19, 2019
8:30-9:30 AM EST
Save the date for a webinar on disclosure of HIV status for paediatric and adolescent populations, co-hosted by UNICEF and the Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation (EGPAF).

During this webinar, you will get the opportunity to hear from the following speakers:


* Dr. Nande Putta, Programme Specialist (Child Survival), UNICEF
* Dr. Natella Rakhmanina, Senior Technical Advisor, EGPAF
* Dr. Judith Kose, Technical Advisor, EGPAF
* Joshua Ochieng, Member, Committee of African Youth Advisors, EGPAF

The webinar will include a discussion of the evidence, policy and clinical practice on HIV status disclosure for these population groups, the components of EGPAF's Disclosure of HIV Status Toolkit<http://www.pedaids.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NewHorizonsDisclosureToolkit_FINAL.pdf>, and how youth participation was at the core of its development. Learn more about the toolkit here<http://www.pedaids.org/resource/disclosure-of-hiv-status-toolkit-for-pediatric-and-adolescent-populations/>.

Join Skype Meeting<https://meet.unicef.org/cmannikarottu/CNR0JP83>
Trouble Joining? Try Skype Web App<https://meet.unicef.org/cmannikarottu/B7CVKBZV?sl=1>

Join by phone
Find a local number<https://dialin.unicef.org/>

Conference ID: 506134684
Forgot your dial-in PIN?<https://dialin.unicef.org/> | Help<https://o15.officeredir.microsoft.com/r/rlidLync15?clid=1033&p1=5&p2=2009>
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Children and AIDS Site<http://www.childrenandaids.org/>


Rikke Le Kirkegaard
Programme Specialist | HIV/AIDS
3 United Nations Plaza, New York, USA, 10017
Phone: +1 (929) 401-1682
Email: rlekirkegaard@unicef.org<mailto:rlekirkegaard@unicef.org>
.................................................................................
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